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Speakers Announced for 2010-2011 Fettuccine Forum

By: Kathleen Tuck   Published 8:38 am / August 26, 2010

The Fettuccine Forum has announced its 2010-2011 schedule. The forum is a free public lecture series held the first Thursday of the month during the academic year. Founded in 1989 by the College of Social Sciences and Public Affairs, the educational forum about the history and cultural life of Boise and the Treasure Valley is presented in conjunction with the City of Boise Department of Arts and History.

Lectures are held in the Rose Room in downtown Boise’s historic Union Block, 718 W. Idaho St. Doors open at 5 p.m. and the presentation begins at 5:30 p.m. Free appetizers and a no host bar are available at each Forum.

Each lecture has a companion workshop through Boise State University. Workshops are offered for graduate and undergraduate credit. Students can register for workshops online through BroncoWeb.

Additional sponsors include the Boise City Office of the Mayor, Idaho Humanities Council, Jenny’s Lunch Line, TAG Historical Research and Platform Architecture Design.

For more information, call 433-5670 or visit www.BoiseArtsAndHistory.com.

This year’s speakers and topics are:

Oct. 7

“Treasure Valley Local Food System: A Progress Report,” by Dave Krick, owner of Red Feather Lounge and Bittercreek Ale House, and Janie Burns, co-owner of Meadowlark Farm

Nov. 4

“Finding Refuge in Idaho: Experiences and Impressions of Boise’s newcomers,” by Jan Reeves, director of the Idaho Office for Refugees

Feb. 3

“Why the Grass is So Green at Shiloh: The U.S. Civil War from an Environmental Perspective,” by Boise State associate history professor Lisa Brady

March 3

“Crime in Boise,” by Boise State criminal justice professor Michael
Blankenship

April 7

“Idaho Writers: Past Tense and Present Tense,” by Cort Conley, director of Literary Services at the Idaho Commission on the Arts

May 5

“Boise 360: Preservation, New Media and the Boise Architecture Project,” by Doug StanWiens of the Boise Architecture Project